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Does listening to music help you concentrate on homework?

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❶So, I need some facts that will prove whether listening to music will help you or not when doing homework.

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To read more on this study, click here. The Mozart Effect is book by Don Campbell that has the world's research on all the beneficial effects of certain type of music. This book includes research on how music makes us smarter. Scientists at Stanford University in California have recently revealed a molecular basis for the Mozart Effect, but not other music.

Rauscher and her colleague H. Li, a geneticist, have discovered that rats, like humans, perform better on learning and memory tests after listening to a specific Mozart sonata. Students who either sang or played a musical instrument scored an average of 51 points higher on the verbal portion of the test and an average of 39 points higher on math.

According to the research outlined in the book, musical pieces such as those of Mozart can relieve stress, improve communication and increase efficiency. Music starts up our brain and makes us feel more energetic and a link has been made between music and learning.

Music also stimulates different regions of the brain responsible for memory, motor control, timing and language. Furthermore, we should also note that these studies only looked at music with vocals, and not music that was purely instrumental.

Research from the University of Dayton found that students performed better at spatial and linguistic processing if Mozart was playing in the background. So should you listen to music while you study or do homework? I have for years had trouble studying or working with music. It is very distracting to me since I have synesthesia.

I see music , but several teachers and other people have told me that I would study better with music in the background. It always seems to distract. Now I know that I am not the only one. Nice topic, I liked the way you started with questions that you sort of answered at the end.

Good, informative sources as well. Do you prefer to study with music? Or since you are a movie buff with a movie going on in the background? Hi Margaret, glad I could help! As for me, I do like having music on, but I prefer instrumental music when I study.

As I mentioned in my post, movie scores work pretty well for me, usually. Another thing I think would be an interesting research topic would be looking at whether the language the vocal music is in will have an effect.

Unfortunately I have to save my movie watching for when my homework is done! Sheela, Too bad, for me it is the other way around. I can put on a good marathon and do lots of homework admittedly not as quickly as without tv.

I would like to see more research into this as well. Hi Sheela, In school I found I could study better without music. TV is a different story. I never work in front of a TV, but I can read on one end of the couch while my husband watches TV from the other. You all need to assess whether writing in first person adds anything to the post.

I think that assessing whether writing in the first person adds to a post is very helpful advice. But given that there is still a trend toward more personal writing styles, and that blogs are by their nature personal, I wonder whether you could say more about how you would gauge whether to write in first person or not.

Funny but still rings true. When we were kids, my dad always used to get angry at my brother and me because we could never study without music running in the background, sometimes it was TV!!

There is no better way to study but your own because different study habits make one more comfortable in comparison to others. This study shows that I should not be so quick to judge other students and how they study because maybe they find it beneficial. Some people succeed when put in specific scenarios, and one scenario I will never find useful is music during study hours, but people are different and results vary. While studying, some people prefer to listen to music.

Others need total silence, it just depends on who you are and what helps you study. The reason why some people need to listen to music is to either crete a background noise, or to relax them and lower stress levels. It has been proven that stress levels are decreased by music. The student could possibly be stressed out over what he or she is studying for, and the music would bring that stress level back down. The music just creates this calm throughout their body and enables them to concentrate extremely hard on what they are doing.

Aside from making them feel better, the music will block out excess noise in the room from other students whispering to each other or the rustling of papers. These are all the positive effects music should have on studying. There is no way it can harm the others around them, who are probably too focused with their own work to notice them anyway.

Earlier in the blog period, I created a similar blog asking the same question. This is a topic that generally interests me as I alway do my homework with music playing in the background.

However, I always want to make sure that I am working in an efficient manner. The one aspect that your blog as well as mine both concluded was that music while studying strictly is based upon the individual. There are a number of confounding variables that come into play that can influence this data.

For example, genre, tone, volume, rate, and whether or not the person is accustomed to working with music can all make a difference in their performance. I have attached a link to the blog post I made regarding the same subject, I hope it can add some more information to this subject. I agree with you, I cannot study with music on.

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Music is a powerful art form that can bring up emotions, inspire motivation and alter your mood. Students frequently listen to music while studying to make the process less painful and, in some cases, because they believe music will help them learn. The effects of listening to music while studying.

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This makes sense, when you consider the purpose of the video game music: to help create an immersive environment and to facilitate but not distract from a task that requires constant attention and focus.

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Can listening to music while preparing a presentation or doing homework help you concentrate? One expert, Alexander Pantelyat, an assistant professor of neurology and the co-founder and co-director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Music and Medicine, sounds off on music’s relationship to language—and whether background music can help you focus on a task. But music that’s too loud or with too much of an upbeat tempo can also be distracting, so having a playlist or specific artist you turn to for studying music can really help. If you’re the type of person who has more difficulty multitasking and is easily distracted, listening to music while studying may just cause your attention to drift to the music rather than help you concentrate on your material.

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8 thoughts on “ Listening to Music While Doing Homework/Studying Lead To Better Results? Stephen B Caruso October 23, at am. While studying, some people prefer to listen to music. Others need total silence, it just depends on who you are and what helps you study. Mar 18,  · When I do my homework, I love listening to music, because it helps me concentrate. I cant do my homework when i am in a silent environment, like my room, because my mind will just doze off and i will completely lose focus. With music playing, I am fully concentrated, and can easily focus on my homework. But my mom disagrees and thinks that listening to music will make me lose elmercuriodigital.ml: Resolved.